Posts Tagged osha

SHARPS INJURY PREVENTION LIST and INFORMATION

Friday, January 27th, 2012 | Permalink

SHARPS INJURY PREVENTION LIST and INFORMATION In all workplaces where employees are exposed to contaminated needles or other contaminated sharps, the employer shall comply with 29CFR 1910.1030, Tennessee Code Annotated 50-3-203(e)(1)-(e)(4) and Tennessee Rule 0800-1-10 as follows: Evaluate available engineered sharps injury prevention devices for all sharps Solicit input from employees directly involved in patient care in the evaluation and selection of devices and document this in the Exposure Control Plan Select the devices most appropriate to your procedures Train employees to use the devices, Require use of the safer devices and use of safer work practices when handling and passing contaminated sharps Update the Exposure Control Plan at least annually or when needed to document the devices evaluated and those placed into use Justify the use of any sharps without sharps injury protection & document in the Exposure Control Plan Maintain a Sharps Injury Log with: Type and brand of device involved in the exposure incident Department or work area of occurrence Explanation of how it occurred The list below is to assist employers in complying with changes in Tennessee Code Annotated Section 50-3-203 (Senate Bill 1023/House Bill 634). Inclusion of types of devices does not represent or imply any evaluation, endorsement, or approval by The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, the Tennessee Department of Health, or any other agency. This list is not all inclusive. Types of Devices and Engineering Controls Injection Equipment Hypodermic needles and syringes- sliding sheath/sleeve, needle guards Needleless jet injection Retractable needles Medication Vial Adaptors (used to access ports of medication vials) IV Medication Delivery Systems Needle guards for pre-filled medication cartridges Needleless IV access-blunted cannulas Needleless valve/access ports and connectors Prefilled medication cartridge with safety needles Recessed/protected needle Needle guards for pre-filled medication cartridges IV Insertion Devices Shielded or retracting peripheral IV catheters Shielded midline IV catheters IV Catheter Securement Devices Epidural/Spinal Needles Blood Collection Devices Arterial blood gas syringes Phlebotomy needles Safety-engineered blood collection needles Blood tube holders Closed venous sampling systems Plastic blood collection tubes Butterfly blood collection needles Blood Donor Plebotomy Devices Other Catheter Equipment Guidewire Introducers-for venous and arterial access Central Venous Catheters Peripheral Inserted Central Catheters Radial Artery Catheters Umbilical cord sampling devices Lancets Laser lancet Retracting Lancet Strip Lancet Laboratory Devices Hemoglobin reader Mylar-wrapped glass capillary tubes Plastic capillary tubes Protected needles for blood culture vial access Vacuum tube stopper Plastic fingerstick sampling blood collection tube Slide preparation devices Surgical Devices Scalpels (disposable safety, retracting, shielded) Ultrasonic scalpel Blunted Suture Needles (for internal suturing- fascia/muscles) Surgical Glues & Adhesives Alternative Skin Closure Devices Surgical Sharps Protection and Other Surgical Sharps Protection Hands free transfer disposable magnetic drapes Sharps counting and disposal system Magnetic floor sweep Scalpel blade removal system Hemodialysis and Apheresis Devices Fluid Sampling Devices Sharps Disposal or Destruction Containers Irrigation Splash Shield (Eliminates use of needles in debridement procedures) Blood Bank Devices Segment sampling devices Nuclear Medicine Devices Cut or puncture-resistant barrier products (gloves, liners or pads) Huber Needle and related devices Smallpox Vaccination Needles Vaginal Retractors Surgical Prep Razors Bone Marrow Collection Systems Dental Safety Devices To access this fact sheet online: www.state.tn.us/labor-wfd/sharpslist.pdf The next list below contains web site resources that can be used for the purposes of information and research. The examples of effective engineering controls in this list do not include all those on the market, but are simply representative of the devices available. Neither the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development nor the Tennessee Department of Health approve, endorse, register or certify any medical devices. Inclusion on this list does not indicate approval, endorsement, registration or certification. International Health Care Worker Safety Center, University of Virginia: Available: Features a list of safety devices with manufacturers and specific product names: http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/epinet/safetydevicenew.cfm and Safety in Surgery : http://healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/safetycenter/internetsafetycenterwebpages/SafetyinSurgery/SafetyinSurgery.cfm International Sharps Injury Prevention Society: Available: http://www.isips.org/ ISIPS is an international group of medical device and pharmaceutical manufacturers, health organizations, healthcare professionals, medical waste disposal experts and others that are joining forces to provide education, information, and product knowledge that will help reduce the number of sharps injuries that occur each year. This website features a list of safety product categories with a description of the category and a list of safety products that fit under that category : http://www.isips.org/safetyproductlist.php Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Safety Alert: Needlestick and Other Risks from Hypodermic Needles on Secondary IV Administration Sets – Piggyback and Intermittent IV: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens/fdaletter.html Warns of the risk of needlestick injuries from the use of hypodermic needles as a connection between two pieces of intravenous (IV) equipment. Describes characteristics of devices which have the potential to decrease the risk. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Glass Capillary Tubes: Joint Safety Advisory About Potential Risks : http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id=22695 Describes safer alternatives to conventional glass capillary tubes. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Needlestick Injuries Available: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens/index.html Features recent news, recognition, evaluation, controls, compliance, and links to information on effective engineering controls. Needle Safety http://www1.va.gov/vasafety/page.cfm?pg=119 Features needle safety information from the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Training for Development of Innovative Control Technologies (TDICT) Project Available: http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=DIRECTIVES&p_id=2570 TDICT “Safety Feature Evaluation Forms” in Appendix B of this directive. OSHA Instruction CPL 2-2.69 Enforcement procedures for the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Available: http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=DIRECTIVES&p_id=2570 Instruction that establishes policies and provides clarification to ensure uniform inspection procedures are followed when conducting inspections to enforce the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Guide List Available: http://www.seiu.org

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SHARPS INJURY PREVENTION LIST and INFORMATION

US Labor Department’s OSHA cites New Jersey contractor for fall hazards, other violations at West Eighth Street work site in Manhattan

Saturday, December 17th, 2011 | Permalink

Region 2 News Release: 11-1759-NEW/BOS 2011-404 Dec. 15, 2011 Contact: Ted Fitzgerald Phone: 617-565-2074 Email: fitzgerald.edmund@dol.gov US Labor Department’s OSHA cites New Jersey contractor for f

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US Labor Department’s OSHA cites New Jersey contractor for fall hazards, other violations at West Eighth Street work site in Manhattan

US Labor Department’s OSHA proposes $90,000 in fines to Pittsburgh-based PPG Industries for safety violations at Cleveland facility

Thursday, December 15th, 2011 | Permalink

Region 5 News Release: 11-1727-CHI Dec. 15, 2011 Contact: Scott AllenRhonda Burke Phone: 312-353-6976312-353-6976 Email: allen.scott@dol.govburke.rhonda@dol.gov US Labor Department’s OSHA proposes $9

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US Labor Department’s OSHA proposes $90,000 in fines to Pittsburgh-based PPG Industries for safety violations at Cleveland facility

US Labor Department’s OSHA cites Bernville, Pa., company for exposing workers to lead hazards and other violations

Thursday, December 15th, 2011 | Permalink

Region 3 News Release: 11-1757-PHI (osha 11-157) Dec. 14, 2011 Contact: Leni FortsonJoanna Hawkins Phone: 215-861-5102215-861-5101 Email: uddyback-fortson.lenore@dol.govhawkins.joanna@dol.gov US Labo

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US Labor Department’s OSHA cites Bernville, Pa., company for exposing workers to lead hazards and other violations

Employer’s Responsibility To Re-evaluate Engineering Controls, i.e., Safer Needle Devices, At Least Annually

Friday, December 9th, 2011 | Permalink

January 20, 2004 Mr. Marty Salanger Manager of Safety, Policy and Government Relations BD Advanced Protection Technologies 1 Becton Drive Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417 Dear Mr. Salanger: Thank you for your October 29, 2003 letter to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) Directorate of Enforcement Programs (DEP). This letter constitutes OSHA’s interpretation only of the requirements discussed and may not be applicable to any question(s) not delineated within your original correspondence. You had specific questions regarding an employer’s responsibility to re-evaluate engineering controls under OSHA’s bloodborne pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030).

Your question is restated below followed by OSHA’s response. We apologize for the delay in responding. Question: If an employer has selected a particular safety-engineered device based on employee feedback, and a reduction in needlestick injuries can be shown as a result of the adoption of the current device, to what extent does an employer need to re-evaluate their chosen device?

Reply: As you are aware, OSHA’s bloodborne pathogens standard requires employers to review and update their Exposure Control Plan (ECP) at least annually [29 CFR 1910.1030(c)(1)(iv)]. It is also a requirement that: 1) annual reviews and updates of ECPs reflect changes in technology that eliminate or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens; and 2) employers document annually their consideration and implementation of appropriate commercially available and effective safer medical devices [29 CFR 1910.1030(c)(1)(iv)(A-B)]. If, after employee input, an employer selects an engineering control that is effective in reducing needlestick injuries, it is not necessary to evaluate all newly emerging engineering controls each year. The employer must simply keep abreast of new and emerging technologies and solicit input from non-managerial employees to determine if the facility’s chosen device remains preferable to any newly developed products. This should be documented in the ECP. Since the requirements of the standard are performance-based, OSHA determines compliance with the standard on a facility-by-facility, instance-by-instance basis, based on the employer’s consideration of safer medical devices, solicitation of input from employees, documentation in an employer’s ECP, and employee interviews.

Thank you for your interest in occupational safety and health. We hope you find this information helpful. OSHA requirements are set by statute, standards, and regulations. Our interpretation letters explain these requirements and how they apply to particular circumstances, but they cannot create additional employer obligations. This letter constitutes OSHA’s interpretation of the requirements discussed. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. Also, from time to time we update our guidance in response to new information. To keep apprised of such developments, you can consult OSHA’s website at http://www.osha.gov . If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact the Office of Health Enforcement at (202) 693-2190. Sincerely, Richard E. Fairfax, Director Directorate of Enforcement Programs —————————————————– ~ www.QDSS.co ~ www.SafetySyringe.cc ~ Needlestick Injuries, Legislation and More…

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Employer’s Responsibility To Re-evaluate Engineering Controls, i.e., Safer Needle Devices, At Least Annually