Posts Tagged green

Trex saves 2.5 billion lb of plastic and wood scrap from landfills

Thursday, June 6th, 2013 | Permalink

When Trex first came on the scene nearly two decades ago, its wood-plastic alternative decking products that incorporated polyethylene film (mostly bags) from post-industrial and some post-consumer sources, was the cutting-edge ‘green’ material. Today Trex, the world’s largest manufacturer of wood-alternative decking and railing products, according to the company, has evolved into one of the largest recyclers of PE flexible film materials. Tagging Options Domain:  All Sites Issue Date:  PT – June 2013 Keywords:  Trex recycling polyethylene read more

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Trex saves 2.5 billion lb of plastic and wood scrap from landfills

Dean Baker: Medicare Costs Too Much and They Better Not Cut It

Monday, March 19th, 2012 | Permalink

Senate_GOPs RT @KellyAyotte: Medical Device Tax will hurt NH medical device companies & increase consumer costs http ://t.co/K9tqbnCL #healthcare #As · 13 minutes ago from TweetDeck …. Occupy 6-Month Anniversary Protest Ends With Zuccotti… FOLLOW US. Facebook. Twitter. Apple. Android. Blackberry. Email · Rss . Connect with your friends. Check out stories you might like, and see what your friends are sharing! Loading twitter module… Most Popular on …

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Dean Baker: Medicare Costs Too Much and They Better Not Cut It

Bloodborne Pathogens and Needlestick Prevention

Friday, November 25th, 2011 | Permalink

Introduction Needlestick injuries and other sharps-related injuries which expose workers to bloodborne pathogens continues to be an important public health concern. Workers in many different occupations are at risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and HIV/AIDS. First aid team members, housekeeping personnel in some settings, nurses and other healthcare providers are examples of workers who may be at risk of exposure.

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Bloodborne Pathogens and Needlestick Prevention

No more tragedies: an introduction to ISO 80369

Thursday, November 24th, 2011 | Permalink

No more tragedies: an introduction to ISO 80369 by Laura Dowling   A hospital patient should never be injured, or worse, because a hospital employee accidentally connects a small tube carrying medicine or nutrients to the wrong tube outside the patient’s body. That’s what happened to Robin Rogers in 2006. According to the New York Times, a hospital nurse caring for Rogers during her final weeks of pregnancy inadvertently connected a feeding tube with liquid nutrients to an IV in Rogers’ arm. The Times noted, “Putting such food directly into the bloodstream is like pouring concrete down a drain.” She died shortly after. Today, a new industry-wide standard defined as ISO 80369 is under development to help eliminate these heartbreaking tragedies. Once completed in the coming years, the international ISO 80369 standard will provide strict guidelines for manufacturers to produce non-interchangeable connectors that only can be used between devices intended for the same clinical application. As the Times noted, the non-interchangeable connectors will be made incompatible “just as different nozzles at gas stations prevent drivers from using the wrong fuel.” The products at the core of ISO 80369 are small-bore luer connectors (less than 8.5 mm in diameter) that hospital personnel use to link, for example, a medicine bag to an IV. The male and female components of luer connectors join together to create secure, yet detachable, leak-proof connections. Multiple connections between medical devices and tubing are common in patient care. Although tiny, these inexpensive connectors play an extremely critical role in any medical device. ISO 80369 is a package consisting of seven sections of standards. The first section, titled “General Requirements” is the initial governing document that was finalized in April this year. Six additional sections–each meticulously focusing on tube connectors for a specific clinical application and market–must be in place in the coming years.    

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No more tragedies: an introduction to ISO 80369

Injury and Hazards in Home Healthcare Nursing are a Growing Concern

Sunday, November 13th, 2011 | Permalink

“Although professionally and personally rewarding for many, home care nursing can be both physically and emotionally demanding. Our study findings suggest that home healthcare work may be dangerous for nurses who work in this setting. These types of injuries are serious as they can result in infection with bloodborne pathogens, such as hepatitis and HIV.” — Robyn Gershon, DrPH, professor of clinical Sociomedical Sciences Injury and Hazards in Home Healthcare Nursing are a Growing Concern October 1, 2009 — Patients continue to enter home healthcare ‘‘sicker and quicker,” often with complex health problems that may require extensive nursing care.

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Injury and Hazards in Home Healthcare Nursing are a Growing Concern