Posts Tagged syringe

Pre-Filled Syringe Warnings!

Monday, January 21st, 2013 | Permalink

Sodium Chloride Injection USP 0.9% With Pre-filled Syringes ***Warnings*** Air Embolism REMOVE ALL AIR FROM THE PRE-FILLED SYRINGE AND ASSOCIATED TUBING PRIOR TO INJECTION TO AVOID AIR EMBOLUS WITH THE ASSOCIATED RISK OF STROKE, ORGAN ISCHEMIA AND/OR INFARCTION, AND DEATH.

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Low “Dead Space” Syringes Could Save Your Life « QD Syringe …

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012 | Permalink

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Low “Dead Space” Syringes Could Save Your Life « QD Syringe …

Low “Dead Space” Syringes Could Save Your Life

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012 | Permalink

Another guest article from Jamie Bridge this week. This time he’s writing about some of the work of researcher Dr. William Zule, looking into how the type of syringe someone uses may have an inpact on their risk of getting the HIV virus. I have had this article a few weeks but it was embargoed until the AIDS2010 conference started as its finding are being presented there.

How syringe type effects HIV risk

New research being presented this week at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna has made a strong link between different types of syringe and levels of HIV transmission through sharing.

Every needle-syringe, when the plunger is fully depressed, retains some fluid or blood in what is termed “dead-space”. Some syringe designs have more of this “dead space” than others – especially those with detachable needles. Depending on the design, some syringes can retain 84 microlitres of fluid. This is a very, very small amount – but other syringe designs can retain as little as 2 microlitres.

So the hypothesis is simple: if you share a syringe with higher “dead-space”, then there will be more blood retained in the syringe and you will be more likely to become infected with blood-borne viruses. If you share a low “dead space” syringe, you are still putting yourself at risk – but perhaps less so, as there is less blood retained when the plunger is fully down.

Previous modelling work by Dr William Zule and colleagues in the USA tried to quantify what this could mean in the real world. The results suggested that injection-related HIV epidemics might not occur when most (95% or more) of injectors use syringes with low “dead space”. If everyone uses higher “dead space” syringes, then HIV prevalence can reach 50% among injectors in just seventeen years. When just one in ten sharing events involve high “dead space” syringes, then HIV prevalence can stabilize.

The findings, albeit theoretical, have clear implications for harm reduction programs. However, in Vienna, the research has been taken to the next level. Data from multi-year HIV prevalence studies were gathered from 35 cities in 20 countries, and local needle exchange workers were contacted to find out what types of syringe were mainly used.

In cities where high “dead space” syringes were mainly used, the average HIV prevalence among injectors was 32.6% (and went up as high as 73%). In cities where low “dead space” syringes were mainly used, the average was just 1.4%. When the data were analyzed, the type of syringe was the only factor closely associated with this pattern in HIV.

More research needs to be done on this topic, and expect to hear a lot more about this in the future – this is an important finding which could have a big impact on harm reduction and the advice given to injectors. Of course, the biggest message is that ALL needle-syringe sharing is a risk. However, if we could reduce HIV transmission simply by providing one kind of syringe over another, then this is something that must be rolled out as soon as possible. Do you know what kind of syringe your local exchange supplies?

A big thank you to Dr William Zule for sharing this research.

Jamie Bridge, MSc, currently works in the Technical Publications and Learning Team of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Before moving to Geneva in 2010, he worked for the International Harm Reduction Association in London, coordinating the international harm reduction conferences. Before that, he also worked in a needle and syringe program in Bedford. Jamie also works voluntarily with UKHRA and the NNEF .

 

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www.QDSyringe.com

www.QDSyringeSystems.com

www.Syringes.co

 

 

Low “Dead Space” Syringes Could Save Your … – QD Syringe Systems

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012 | Permalink

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Low “Dead Space” Syringes Could Save Your … – QD Syringe Systems

Sen. Franken Introduces Bill to Get Medical Devices to Market More Quickly and Safely

Monday, January 30th, 2012 | Permalink

Sen. Franken Introduces Bill to Get Medical Devices to Market More Quickly and Safely

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Today, U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) introduced the Patient Access to Medical Innovation Act to get innovative medical devices to market more quickly and safely. Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and John Kerry (D-Mass.) are the lead cosponsors of Sen. Franken’s legislation.

“After speaking with countless patients, doctors, and members of the medical device industry in Minnesota, I’ve learned that certain barriers in the regulatory process are making it harder to get patients the medical devices they need,” said Sen. Franken. “My legislation would remove unnecessary barriers so that these critical medical devices get to the patients that need them as quickly and safely as possible.”

Sen. Franken’s Patient Access to Medical Innovation Act would:

  • Promote the development of devices to treat patients with rare diseases;
  • Help improve the federal Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval process for medical devices by allowing the agency to more easily consult with experts;
  • Lift the current profit cap on “humanitarian use devices”– devices that treat rare conditions– that go through a special approval process. Eliminating this red tape will support the development of treatments for people with rare conditions.

Yesterday, Sen. Franken visited Medtronic in Mounds View, MN, and met with several hundred company officials and employees to discuss his new legislation. While there he also met with doctors and patients who may be helped by his legislation. They all agreed on the need for these reforms during his visit.   Today, Sen. Franken is also participating in a hearing on medical devices in the Senate health committee, of which he is a member. And Minnesotan Ralph Hall, a law professor at the University of Minnesota and the CEO of MR3, a start-up medical device company, will testify before the committee.

Patient Access to Medical Innovation Act

~ www.QDSS.co

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Sen. Franken Introduces Bill to Get Medical Devices to Market More Quickly and Safely