Posts Tagged screening

Optical system removes black pellets with ease

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013 | Permalink

    A new optical pellet screening system employs a combination of LED illumination, cameras, and air blowers to detect and remove pellets with black spots from a stream of resi pellets with a resolution (spot size) of 0.03 mm. The Super Platon KP-10000T from Kubota (Tokyo) was recently installed at an Asian elastomer compounder. Tagging Options Domain:  All Sites read more

Continue Reading:
Optical system removes black pellets with ease

MMWR: HIV Screening of Male Inmates During Prison Intake Medical Evaluation — Washington, 2006–2010

Friday, June 24th, 2011 | Permalink

Since 2006, CDC has recommended routine, opt-out human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening for patients in health-care settings with a prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection of ≥0.1%. Before September 2007, the Washington State Department of Corrections (WADOC) only provided HIV testing to inmates on request. In September 2007, WADOC began routine HIV opt-in screening in which inmates were notified that HIV screening would be performed during the prison intake medical evaluation if they consented. In March 2010, WADOC switched to a routine opt-out HIV screening model in which inmates are notified that HIV screening will be performed unless they decline. To assess the proportion of inmates screened and the number of infections diagnosed during the use of the three HIV testing policies, WADOC reviewed HIV testing data for male inmates undergoing intake medical evaluation during January 2006–December 2010.

Read More:
MMWR: HIV Screening of Male Inmates During Prison Intake Medical Evaluation — Washington, 2006–2010

MMWR: Results of the Expanded HIV Testing Initiative — 25 Jurisdictions, United States, 2007–2010

Friday, June 24th, 2011 | Permalink

Approximately 20% of the estimated 1.2 million persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States at the end of 2008 were not aware of their infection. Testing, diagnosis, medical care, treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and access to prevention services soon after HIV infection can prevent morbidity and mortality and reduce a person’s risk for transmitting HIV. In 2006, CDC recommended screening patients aged 13–64 years for HIV infection in health-care settings that have a prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection of ≥0.1%. In October 2007, CDC initiated the Expanded HIV Testing Initiative (ETI), through which it funded 25 health departments to facilitate HIV screening and increase diagnoses of HIV infections and linkage to care among populations disproportionately affected by HIV, especially non-Hispanic blacks. This report describes the results of that effort.

See the original post:
MMWR: Results of the Expanded HIV Testing Initiative — 25 Jurisdictions, United States, 2007–2010